ryanpanos:

Symmetry | Edward Neumann | Via

ryanpanos:

Aga Khan Museum | Fumihiko Maki | Via

nnmprv:

Heydar Aliyev Airport by Autoban.

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archatlas:

Emerson College Los Angeles Morphosis

(via hyperform)

architecturia:

Parish Church of San lovely art

architecturia:

Parish Church of San lovely art

(via thomortiz)

ryanpanos:

Incineration Line | Erick van Egeraat | Tim Van de Velde | Via

The plant will incinerate waste, from nine surrounding municipalities and from many places abroad to produce electricity and heat power for the whole region of Roskilde. To provide the huge new incinerator line, planned in a relatively flat landscape and next to the relatively small city of Roskilde with a suitable appearance, an international design competition was organized. In 2008 the jury unanimously selected the design proposed by Erick van Egeraat. The design presents an iconic expression for the otherwise functional architecture of the local waste management company Kara/Noveren’s next generation incineration line. The façade consists of two layers: the inner layer is the skin which provides the actual climatic barrier, allowing the second skin to be treated more freely – raw umber-coloured aluminium plates with an irregular pattern of laser cut circular holes. The aluminium plates are treated to give them the desired colour and patina at day time. At night, the programmable lighting, installed between the two facades, gives the building an additional metaphor.

the-gasoline-station:

Wanda Reign Hotel by Make Architects

902 hexagonal modules, each angled in both plan and section to protect the rooms from solar gain and create a dynamic texture on the surface of the building.

archatlas:

Eladio Dieste

"I studied engineering because I am interested physics astronomy - I am fascinated by the posibility of understanding reality through the physical mathematical language." Eladio Dieste

In an industry so often enamored by media-coddled superstars with trendy clients, Eladio Dieste stands out as a refreshing and inspiring figure. Born in Uruguay, Dieste spent most of his long and productive career creating industrial and agrarian works, public infrastructure, commercial buildings, and small churches in his native country. Dieste’s unique and innovative method of design, a melding of architecture and engineering, elevated these often humble buildings to masterworks of art. Capitalizing on his revolutionary approach to building with reinforced masonry, Dieste built aesthetically stunning structures economically. If he often worked outside the architectural mainstream, he never lost sight of the modest people for whom his structures were built.” Eladio Dieste: Innovation in Structural Art by Stanford Anderson

Images found here.

Thanks Sam for reminding me of Dieste!